Covid lockdown UK: Cornish cheese firm slashes prices before it has to throw away tonnes of stock

A cheese-making firm is slashing prices after struggling to promote its stock throughout lockdown, whereas farmers are warning that their pigs are getting ‘too fats’ to be bought to supermarkets.

The Cornish Cheese Company faces throwing away up to two tonnes of blue cheese which it has been unable to promote through the Covid shutdown.

The firm sells 80 per cent of its product to the hospitality sector, which has been crippled by authorities curbs on motion and has been closed since early January. 

But with a three-week window before the cheese goes off, the corporate is now slashing prices in a bid to entice on-line prospects into shopping for its merchandise direct.

It comes as farmers warn their pigs are getting so porky throughout lockdown that British supermarkets not need to purchase them.

Farmers say Covid is inflicting knock-on delays inside abattoirs, which means pigs are being persevering with to develop previous their normal promoting weight.

They warn supermarkets are actually turning their noses up on the bigger pigs, and say that Brexit pink tape is making it even tougher for them to export the porky pigs to the Continent. 

The Cornish Cheese Company faces throwing away up to two tonnes of blue cheese which it has been unable to sell during the Covid shutdown

The Cornish Cheese Company faces throwing away up to two tonnes of blue cheese which it has been unable to promote through the Covid shutdown 

Meanwhile, farmers warn their pigs (pictured: library image) are getting so porky during lockdown that British supermarkets no longer want to buy them

Meanwhile, farmers warn their pigs (pictured: library picture) are getting so porky throughout lockdown that British supermarkets not need to purchase them

The company sells 80 per cent of its product to the hospitality sector, which has been crippled by government curbs on movement and has been closed since early January

The firm sells 80 per cent of its product to the hospitality sector, which has been crippled by authorities curbs on motion and has been closed since early January

But bosses on the Cornish Cheese firm are decided to avert the double meals catastrophe by promoting direct to prospects. 

Ben Stansfield informed the BBC: ‘We have been making this cheese again in October and September, and we did not count on a lockdown in January, February, March and possibly even longer.

‘And as a result of of hospitality having to shut we misplaced our wholesale enterprise in a single day. We have gotten a giant fridge full – about two tonnes.

‘Normally we might promote this simply with all of the wholesalers open however it is all going to go off inside two to three weeks.

‘We are attempting our greatest to not have to throw any away however we cannot find a way to promote it after that and you may’t freeze two tonnes of cheese.’

The firm, based mostly on Bodmin Moor, Cornwall has developed its on-line platform in current months and appealed on social media for individuals to purchase the remaining stock.

Founder Philip Stansfield stated: ‘What catches us out is when lockdown finishes and you have not acquired sufficient cheese.

‘We might have bought twice as a lot final July and August that are our busiest months if we had had the stock. At the second we’re not certain when to begin pushing once more. It’s a nightmare.

‘If we do not open till May now we have acquired to have cheese to promote as May, June, July and August is when it begins to get actually busy for us.’

The firm is presently solely making cheese someday per week ‘to preserve us ticking over, and the milk getting used’, they defined.

Other cheese makers have reduce on manufacturing and have misplaced gross sales by pubs and eating places being closed.

Martin Gaylard, from Curds and Croust, close to Liskeard, stated his delicate cheese matures after about 20 days. ‘I’ve had to put the brakes on,’ he stated.

‘It impacts me in phrases of gross sales however does not have an effect on me in phrases of having heaps of cheese with nowhere for it to go, as a result of I’m not producing it.’

Meanwhile, farmers say a mixture of Covid-19 chaos and Brexit hiccups imply their pigs are surviving too lengthy and gaining weight in consequence. 

Cramped abattoirs and pork packing vegetation have seen rising numbers of staff sick with coronavirus. It means they’ve had to cut back their workload.

In flip, pigs are staying on the farm for longer and gorging themselves into weight problems.

Anna Longthorp, an award-winning pig farmer in Howden, East Yorks, stated: ‘Pigs are getting greater and larger and larger. We cannot cease them rising.

‘I’ve been trailering them everywhere in the nation to simply receives a commission principally.

‘Quite a bit lower than our value of manufacturing.’

Two farmers, talking to BBC Radio 4 final week, stated that in some circumstances, the larger a pig will get, the tougher it is to promote.

Anna Longthorp, an award-winning pig farmer in Howden, East Yorks, said: 'Pigs are getting bigger and bigger and bigger. We can't stop them growing.

Anna Longthorp, an award-winning pig farmer in Howden, East Yorks, stated: ‘Pigs are getting greater and larger and larger. We cannot cease them rising.

One farmer stated: ‘Like every other manufacturing enterprise, now we have to produce to a spec and if we do not hit the spec, we do not receives a commission for the product.’

Another added: ‘Once a pig hits a sure weight, it not suits in that packet, and so supermarkets penalise us massively.’

The National Pig Association estimated 100,000 pigs are caught in lockdown on UK farms proper now.

Brexit hiccups have additionally induced some delays, with some farmers having had points exporting animals due to mountains of pink tape and an absence of border management ports for livestock on the Continent.

John Royle, the National Farming Union’s chief livestock adviser, stated final week: ‘There have been no stay exports of any cattle, sheep or goats since January 1.

‘That’s as a result of there are not any border management posts for them at EU mainland ports.’

Slamming the difficulties, Zoe Davies of The National Pig Association stated: ‘We flagged it with Defra final 12 months in June or July. But they principally stated it was our drawback.’

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